Jan Stallaert


Subtle Bias Can Derail Results

crowdsourcing

If Not Well Managed, Crowdsourcing Contests Produce Undesirable Results, UConn Researchers Discover

Crowdsourcing firms and platform designers may need to revisit their strategies, according to UConn School of Business researchers, because the competitive nature of the work, eager newcomers trying to promote themselves, and subtle biases in presentations may be skewing the outcomes. Continue Reading


IBM Partners with UConn, Other Institutions to Prepare Students for Big Data Jobs

(6/12/2014) – 4.4 million jobs will be created worldwide to support big data by 2015, according to a Gartner press release on key issues facing the IT industry.

To prepare students for big data careers, the UConn School of Business offers graduate and undergraduate degree programs in business analytics that focus on data management, analytics, and using emerging technologies to better manage financial risk and other business needs.Continue Reading


IBM Partners with UConn, Other Institutions to Prepare Students for Big Data Jobs

IBM

4.4 million jobs will be created worldwide to support big data by 2015, according to a Gartner press release on key issues facing the IT industry.

To prepare students for big data careers, the UConn School of Business offers graduate and undergraduate degree programs in business analytics that focus on data management, analytics, and using emerging technologies to better manage financial risk and other business needs.Continue Reading


Honor, Wisdom, Earnestness: Faculty and Students Recognized for Academic Achievements

School of Business Awards and Honors
The best and brightest of UConn School of Business were honored Friday morning, April 25 at the 2014 School of Business Awards & Honors ceremony. Honorees, family and friends gathered in the Dave Ivry Seminar Classroom at the School of Business in Storrs for the annual celebration, where 2014 Student Hall of Fame Fellows were recognized, Ackerman Scholars were awarded, Faculty Awards were presented, and new members were officially inducted to the Beta Gamma Sigma honor society.Continue Reading


Ph.D. Student Teaching Awards 2013

On February 27, business PhD students and coordinators for the five Ph.D. concentrations celebrated student accomplishments during the last year at the sixth annual “Ph.D. Student Night of Appreciation.” School of Business Dean John Elliott was also in attendance, providing the doctoral students with an opportunity to chat with him informally.

At this event, we announced the winners of the school’s 2013 PhD Student Teaching Awards. Each of the five Ph.D. program concentrations gave a teaching award to a qualified student in their concentration. The coordinators of the five concentrations (John Phillips – ACCT, Joseph Golec – FNCE, Qing Cao – MGMT, Bill Ross – MKTG, and Jan Stallaert – OPIM) then decided as a group which of the winners of a teaching award in a concentration would receive this year’s School of Business teaching award. Dean Elliott made the announcement.

The winners of the 2013 teaching awards in each concentration are:

Accounting – Elizabeth Kohl

Finance – Tingyu Zhou

Marketing – Jeff Carlson

Management – Lauren D’Innocenzo

OPIM – Gang Wang

The winner of the 2013 School of Business Ph.D. Teaching Award (program-wide) is:

Management – Lauren D’Innocenzo

Please join us in congratulating these doctoral students for their superb performance in the classroom and as outstanding teacher-scholars.


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Ph.D. Student Teaching Awards

On March 22, the Ph.D. students and coordinators for the five Ph.D. concentrations met at Willington Pizza for a “BUS Ph.D. Student Night of Appreciation,” where we celebrated student accomplishments during the last year.

At this event, we announced the winners of the school’s 2012 Ph.D. student teaching awards.  Each of the five Ph.D. program concentrations gave a teaching award to a qualified student in their concentration.  The coordinators of the five concentrations (John Phillips – ACCT,  Joe Golec – FNCE,  Lucy Gilson – MGMT,  Bill Ross – MKTG, and Jan Stallaert – OPIM), along with the program director (Gary Powell), then decided as a group which of the winners of a teaching award in a concentration would receive this year’s School of Business teaching award.Continue Reading


Paper Received Best IS Publication of the Year Award 2010

A paper co-written by faculty members of the University of Connecticut School of Business Department of Operations and Information Management has been nominated as the best ACM TMIS paper of 2010 and is also one out of five recipients of the Best IS Publications of the Year Awards 2010.  The paper, titled “Why Give Away Something for Nothing? Investigating Virtual Goods Pricing and Permission Strategies,” was co-written in December 2010 by Dr. Sulin Ba, Professor; Dr. Dan Ke; Dr. Jan Stallaert, Associate Professor; and Zhongju Zhang, Associate Professor.

The Best Publications Awards were established to recognize the breadth of high quality work that is being published in the Information Systems discipline. This award was designed to bring outstanding papers across a range of journals to the attention of the IS community, and to give due credit to the journals in which they are published. Each year journal editors nominate the best paper published in their journal in the preceding year. A committee composed of Senior Scholars reviews the nominations from journal editors and selects five papers as the recipients of this prestigious award.

“Why Give Away Something for Nothing? Investigating Virtual Goods Pricing and Permission Strategies” is about the world of virtual goods.  The question of how a creator sets prices for a virtual good, as to maximize their profit, is discussed.  The major difference with virtual goods is that many times consumers will want to use multiple copies of the same good, which results in an increase in the consumer’s utility.  The focus of the research is on the copy permission of virtual goods.  An economic model is developed and examined under different conditions, to find which setting is best for the copy permission that leads to the highest profit, as well as how subsequent pricing strategies are affected.  Both theoretical and practical implications of researched are discussed within the paper.


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Ph.D. Student Night of Appreciation

On March 24, the University of Connecticut School of Business Ph.D.  students and coordinators for School’s five Ph.D. concentrations met at Willington Pizza for a “BUS Ph.D. Student Night of Appreciation,” to celebrate student accomplishments during the last year.

The winners of the School’s 2011 Ph.D.  student teaching awards were announced at this event.  Each of the five Ph.D. program concentrations gave a teaching award to a qualified student in their concentration.  The coordinators of the five concentrations (John Phillips – ACCT,  Joe Golec – FNCE,  Lucy Gilson – MGMT,  Bill Ross – MKTG, and  Jan Stallaert – OPIM), along with the program director (Gary Powell), then decided as a group which of the winners of a teaching award in a concentration would receive this year’s School of Business teaching award.

The winner of the 2011 School of Business Ph.D. Student Teaching Award is Reilly White.

The winners of the 2011 teaching awards in the concentrations are:

Accounting – Erin Henry

Finance – Reilly White

Marketing – Hang Nguyen

Management – Michael Kukenberger

OPIM – Pantea Alirezazadeh

Pictured (left to right): Erin Henry, Pantea Alirezazadeh, Reilly White, Gary Powell, Hang Nguyen.


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Ackerman Scholars Announced

The Dean’s Council has reviewed the Ackerman Scholars at the University of Connecticut School of Business and made the following awards:

Appointed for the next two years (2011-12 and 2012-13) are:

Continuing in their second year are:

The Ackerman Scholar award recognizes significant and continuing all round academic productivity among the faculty of the School. It is awarded to faculty who are not already supported by Chair or Professorship appointments. The award is supported by the Ackerman Fund, the School and the departments. The purpose of the Ackerman Fund is to “grant a monetary reward to faculty members who have excelled in classroom teaching, curriculum development, research, outreach to business and state agencies.”


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