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Professors: Pandemic Creates ‘Watershed Moment’ for Telecommuting

Woman seated at a computer in a home office.
Because of the coronavirus pandemic, more workers than ever are telecommuting. (Getty Images)

Welcome to your new office!

Whether you’re a CEO, a psychologist, or a TV meteorologist, the COVID-19 pandemic has likely forced you to make the abrupt switch from the familiar comfort of a traditional office to the rewards and challenges of working from home.Continue Reading


Accounting Professor’s Big Focus: Preventing, Detecting Corporate Tax Loopholes

(Getty Images)
(Getty Images)

Assistant professor of accounting Frank Murphy is very familiar with the demands placed on UConn’s undergraduate accounting majors. Just 13 years ago, he was in their shoes.

After earning his bachelor’s degree in business from UConn in 2007, Murphy worked at Deloitte in Hartford for six years, performing international tax consulting for Fortune 100 clients. He also completed a masters from Bentley University, a Ph.D. from University of Arizona and became a licensed CPA.

He returned to UConn as a faculty member in 2017.

“Many of the professors who I had as an undergraduate have retired, but Dave Weber is one of the faculty members who instructed me, and someone who I now work with often,” Murphy said. “I think it’s great when professionally things come full circle.”

“What I enjoy most about my job is conducting research and having complete creative freedom to pursue topics that interest me,” he said. “I also love working with the Ph.D. students who are so driven and give 110 percent to truly becoming a scholar.”

Murphy specializes in corporate taxation, primarily focusing on international tax planning and financial reporting issues. Below he answers questions about his work.

Q: What is the business problem that you most want to address as a researcher?

A: Well, there are two. In the realm of public finance, academics are trying to work with Congress, the European Union, and other governing bodies on issues surrounding how large, multinational corporations avoid taxes. When nations write tax policies, there are always going to ambiguities in the law and unintended consequences. At this point, the general sentiment among policymakers, and the public, is that large multinational firms are not paying their fair share. What is “fair” is subjective, but as an academy we are still trying to determine how much and what types of firms are most likely to move profits offshore for tax purposes. This policy frontier is exciting for researchers like myself, and one of the focuses of my work.

Another interest of mine is how we disclose tax information. You hear, for example, people talking about Amazon and how they can’t tell whether the company pays tax or how much it pays. I’m interested in this type of tax disclosure. Anyone who has ever picked up a financial statement and tried to read the tax footnote likely thinks, ‘There must be a better way than this!’ My research helps identify how firms may want to supplement their reporting to aid financial statement users.

Assistant professor Frank Murphy (Nathan Oldham / UConn School of Business)
Assistant professor Frank Murphy (Nathan Oldham / UConn School of Business)

Q: What is on your research ‘bucket list’?

A: In the future, I’d like to have the opportunity to run some field experiments with government agencies. It would be interesting to work with state agencies to delve more deeply into their tax structure to see how it influences actions. For example, the revenue estimates for the 10¢ plastic bag tax have been far off the mark. The reason is that we did not have a strong grasp on how quickly consumers or stores would change their shopping bag practices. The goal of this research would be to further understand how taxes influence real decision making. It would be a huge time commitment, but something that would be very interesting.

Q: What advice do you offer to your students as they prepare for their careers? How much is ‘big data’ knowledge in demand?

A: Certainly any accounting student who can do computer coding or analyze statistical trends in data will be in tremendous demand in the job market right now. At the same time, that’s not our bread-and-butter. Our job is to understand the accounting field, and we ultimately aim to produce the next generation of CPAs. I think it is also important to note that our students shouldn’t have a single focus on taking classes to tackle ‘big data.’ Our world is increasingly quantitative, but there is an equally strong demand for writing and critical-thinking skills. In the accounting profession, I think those who are able to write a great email to a client are worth their weight in gold.


Shreya Murthy ’21, Triple Major and University Scholar, Examines Aviation Safety

Triple major and University Scholar Shreya Murthy (Nathan Oldham / UConn School of Business)
Triple major and University Scholar Shreya Murthy (Nathan Oldham / UConn School of Business)

Maybe it was because she took her first transcontinental flight at 4-months old, or that she’s flown some 60 times since, but junior Shreya Murthy is fascinated by commercial aviation.Continue Reading


Q&A: Keeping an Eye on the Gatekeepers of Retirement Funds

Jose Vicente Martinez, assistant professor of finance. (Nathan Oldham / UConn School of Business)
Jose Vicente Martinez, assistant professor of finance. (Nathan Oldham / UConn School of Business)

Jose Vicente Martinez, assistant professor of finance, joined UConn six years ago, after working as a university lecturer and senior research fellow in finance at Said Business School at the University of Oxford.Continue Reading



Bad Bosses: Tell-Tale Signs, Potential Solutions

Angry manager shouting at his coworkers during a meeting in the office.
(istockphoto.com)

During his time as a strategic planner with his former employer, Professor Kyoungjo “Jo” Oh had a tyrannical boss, who used to yell, swear, berate, and bully his employees.

The experience fostered Oh’s interest in organizational behavior, human resources management, and workplace civility. He hopes his research can help make the workplace more welcoming for all.Continue Reading


Alumna Kathy Luria ’91: Leading Philanthropy for Webster Bank

Kathy Luria '91, SVP, community affairs and director of philanthropy at Webster Bank. (Nathan Oldham / UConn School of Business)
Kathy Luria ’91, SVP, community affairs and director of philanthropy at Webster Bank. (Nathan Oldham / UConn School of Business)

Few people are lucky enough to traverse the road of life without hitting a few potholes. For alumna Kathy Luria ’91, senior vice president, community affairs and director of philanthropy at Webster Bank, that jarring, shake-you-to-the-core moment came in 1988.Continue Reading


UConn-Backed MedTech Accelerator Advances 10 Powerful Startups; ‘These Companies Will Absolutely Change Lives’

Armin Tahmasbi Rad, co-founder and CEO of Encapsulate
Armin Tahmasbi Rad, co-founder and CEO of Encapsulate (Nathan Oldham / UConn School of Business)

The excitement was palpable Monday night as 10 health care startups, including two that are UConn-grown, shared their medical technology innovations that promise unique solutions for some of medicine’s most vexing problems.Continue Reading


MSBAPM Program Among Top 20 in Nation

Group of MSBAPM Students focusing on a laptop computer.
Students from the MSBAPM program spend time studying in the Graduate Business Learning Center, in Hartford, CT. (Nathan Oldham / UConn School of Business)

The UConn MSBAPM program is among the best masters of business analytics programs in the nation, according to The Financial Engineer (TFE) Times. The program was ranked No. 19.Continue Reading


EMBAs: Trip to South Africa Among the Highlights of Education

EMBA Class of 2020 join local guide Xolani Mapila at a community center in Langa Township within Cape Town.
EMBA Class of 2020 join local guide Xolani Mapila at a community center in Langa Township within Cape Town. (Contributed Photo)

Before the EMBA Class of 2020 had landed in South Africa, Brian Waddell, director of process improvement at The Hartford, got a bird’s-eye view of the racial disparity that has divided the land for so long. Continue Reading