Marketing



Consumer Pseudo-Showrooming and Omni-Channel Placement Strategies

Management Information Systems Quarterly Vol. 41, Iss. 2 (2017)

Zheyin (Jane) Gu, Giri Kumar Tayi

Recent advances in information technologies (IT) have powered the merger of online and offline retail channels into one single platform. Modern consumers frequently switch between online and offline channels when they navigate through various stages of the decision journey, motivating multichannel sellers to develop omni-channel strategies that optimize their overall profit. This study examines consumers' cross-channel search behavior of "pseudo-showrooming," or the consumer behavior of inspecting one product at a seller's physical store before buying a related but different product at the same seller’s online store, and investigates how such consumer behavior allows a multichannel seller to achieve better coordination between its online and offline arms through optimal product placement strategies. Full article.


Three Marketing Professors to Retire

Marketing Department Retirement Reception - April 2017

School of Business Wishes a Happy Future to Professors Carrafiello, Spiggle and Ross

Kayaking in South Carolina, reading, gardening and tackling new research projects are on the retirement ‘to-do’ lists of three prominent Marketing Department professors.

This year’s three School of Business retirees all hail from the Marketing Department, and include: Continue Reading


Seven Business Faculty Honored

Professor Greg Reilly, teaching an Executive MBA course in Hartford, Conn. (Nathan Oldham/UConn School of Business)
Professor Greg Reilly, teaching an Executive MBA course in Hartford, Conn. (Nathan Oldham/UConn School of Business)

Professor Reilly Recognized for Remarkable Research; Peers Honored for Teaching Strategies

Management Professor Greg Reilly earned the School of Business’ annual award for Research Excellence, an achievement that is based on five years of academic success. Continue Reading


Dean’s Annual Report 2016

UConn School of Business Dean's Annual Report 2016

Transforming Futures

In describing the UConn School of Business at this moment, 76 years into its accomplished history, the word “engaged” captures the essence. Our students, faculty and staff are engaged with each other, with our alumni, with the corporate community and with the University.

The School’s growth has been extraordinary, both in terms of enrollment and creating and maintaining vibrant, effective and relevant academic programs. We are transforming the future—of our students, our state, our industries and our world. There is much to celebrate.

We invite you to read the 2016 Dean’s Annual Report.



I’ve Got to Buy That!

Lenovo Thinkpad X201 Notebook (iStock)

Best Mergers and Acquisitions Significantly Enhance Consumers’ Perception of Products

Consumer-product companies that execute well-thought-out mergers and acquisitions can tap a customer gold mine.

Not only can they appeal to savvy shoppers’ brand preferences, but also boost profits, streamline expenses and increase prominence among vendors. Continue Reading


Towards Sovereign Equity

Stanford Journal of Law, Business, and Finance, Vol. 21, No. 2 (2016)

Stephen Park, Tim R. Samples

Sovereigns are unique market participants in the global financial system, and sovereign debt markets largely operate in a legal and regulatory void. This Article adds an important and timely perspective by examining the concept of equity in sovereign debt finance. Governments, unlike corporations, rely almost exclusively on debt to externally finance their investments and operations. GDP-linked securities, which provide interest payments indexed to the sovereign issuer’s rate of growth, are sovereign debt instruments with certain equity-like characteristics. This Article considers whether innovation towards sovereign equity can help mitigate problems associated with sovereign debt crises. To address this question, we analyze the use of GDP-linked securities in recent sovereign debt restructurings by Argentina, Greece, and Ukraine. Drawing on this analysis, we explore more broadly the legal implications of sovereign equity, and conclude that these applications offer opportunities to help manage sovereign finance in the absence of readily enforceable international financial regulation. Full article.


Contracting for Innovation and Innovating Contracts

Journal of Strategic Contracting and Negotiation (2016)

Thomas D. Barton, Gerlinde Berger-Walliser, Helena Haapio

This special issue of the Journal of Strategic Contracting and Negotiation (JSCAN) is devoted to “contracting for innovation and innovating contracts.” From the inception of planning for the issue, the co-editors hoped to attract contributions from a full range of professionals engaged in contract theory and practice: research academics, contract managers, corporate executives, and legal counsel, plus what JSCAN Editor-in-Chief Tyrone Pitsis told us are called “pracademics:” those who straddle research and commercial environments, making concrete contributions through collaborative projects, experiments, interviews, software development, or theory-building. JSCAN is a natural publication outlet for such partnerships, since so many of the 40,000 worldwide members of the International Association of Contract and Commercial Management (JSCAN’s parent organization) are thought-leaders in every aspect of commercial contracting. Full article.


PROMESA and Puerto Rico’s Pathways to Solvency

Harvard Law School Forum on Corporate Governance and Financial Regulation – Facing a self-declared “death spiral” of public debt, the Governor of Puerto Rico announced a debt moratorium earlier this year, halting payments to bondholders. A series of missed payments followed, including a landmark default on constitutionally guaranteed bonds in July. At the same time, Congress passed the Puerto Rico Oversight, Management, and Economic Stability Act (PROMESA or “promise” in Spanish), which combines a debt restructuring system with federal controls over the island’s finances. But enacting PROMESA is only a first step. Coordination and engagement with creditors is the next step—and an even more complicated one—in Puerto Rico’s long journey towards solvency and fiscal stability.