Marketing


From Visualization to Legal Design: A Collaborative and Creative Process

American Business Law Journal, Vol. 54, No. 2, Summer 2017, p. 347-392

Gerlinde Berger-Walliser

Although the law remains predominately focused on the written word, a growing body of scholarship and legal practice reflect a dramatic increase in the use of visualization in virtually every legal context. Three starting assumptions underpin our ideas of implementing visualization ideas and techniques into what we call “Legal Design” that may aid contract simplification:

First, we examine the use of images in business documents and in statutes, rather than for advocacy. Moving away from adversarial settings offers several advantages. It permits us to illustrate the use of images in a broader range of practical legal applications. It also enables us to adopt the thinking, values, and methods of a non-traditional approach to lawyering and the law: “Preventive Law” or “Proactive Law” (combined here as “PPL”). Second, we offer guidelines for using images in conjunction with words rather than in isolation, since the law only rarely abandons its verbal expression. Realistically, visualization is almost always used in hybrid ways — combinations of words and images to enhance the effectiveness of communication. That seems unlikely to change, given the need for detail and refinement when the law is imposing duties on people. Finally, our method analyzes variables surrounding choices and consequences about the process of generating, transmitting, and using images to accompany legal language. Examining this dynamic can deepen our understanding of the information conveyed; it can also reveal the potential of visualization for creating spillover value for businesses or regulatory agencies that employ the images to advance legal and organizational effectiveness. Full article.


Precarious Work: The Need for Flextime Employment Rights and Proposals for Reform

Berkeley Journal of Employment & Labor Law, Vol. 37, Issue 1 (2016)

Robert Bird

Millions of Americans are under intense pressure to balance work and family responsibilities. The feeling of overwork is rampant, with nearly half of employees feeling overworked or overwhelmed by their workplace responsibilities. This Article argues for a suite of legal protections that would allow working families, especially single-parent and low-income families, basic access to the rights and protections of flexible work. These protections include amending FLSA rides to better protect non-exempt workers from intrusions into their non-working time, as well as expanding the use of the FMLA to encourage more use of flexible leave. This article also recommends adoption of right-to-request legislation, enabling employees to request a flexible schedule and have that request meaningfully evaluated by their employer without fear of retaliation. Full article.

Turning Corporate Compliance into Competitive Advantage

University of Pennsylvania Journal of Business Law, Vol. 19, No.2 (2017)

Robert Bird, Stephen Park

Compliance is a core concern for corporate governance. Firms devote tremendous amounts of money, personnel, and attention to ensure compliance with regulatory mandates — and yet compliance failures proliferate. This is because the current static and binary view of compliance hinders both efficient compliance by firms and effective regulation by government. Understanding the reality that compliance is both dynamic and driven by efficiency empowers firms to evolve past mere conformance and into wealth maximizing innovation. This Article develops an efficient investment-risk (EIR) model of compliance that captures the tradeoffs between cost and risk, parses the oft-commingled concepts of technical efficiency and allocative efficiency, and enables firms to obtain a competitive advantage through compliance. We also turn our attention to regulators, and highlight how the EIR model can enhance regulatory design, foster regulator-firm cooperation, and advance the mutual goals of business and society. Full article.


Consumer Pseudo-Showrooming and Omni-Channel Placement Strategies

Management Information Systems Quarterly Vol. 41, Iss. 2 (2017)

Zheyin (Jane) Gu, Giri Kumar Tayi

Recent advances in information technologies (IT) have powered the merger of online and offline retail channels into one single platform. Modern consumers frequently switch between online and offline channels when they navigate through various stages of the decision journey, motivating multichannel sellers to develop omni-channel strategies that optimize their overall profit. This study examines consumers' cross-channel search behavior of "pseudo-showrooming," or the consumer behavior of inspecting one product at a seller's physical store before buying a related but different product at the same seller’s online store, and investigates how such consumer behavior allows a multichannel seller to achieve better coordination between its online and offline arms through optimal product placement strategies. Full article.


Spring 2017 Research Newsletter

At the University of Connecticut, we are extremely proud of our exceptional, talented and dedicated faculty. Nevertheless, it is particularly gratifying when other professional organizations join us in recognizing our professors’ many achievements.
Last semester, two of our distinguished professors, James Marsden and John Mathieu, were honored with prestigious, lifetime achievement awards.


Three Marketing Professors to Retire

Marketing Department Retirement Reception - April 2017

School of Business Wishes a Happy Future to Professors Carrafiello, Spiggle and Ross

Kayaking in South Carolina, reading, gardening and tackling new research projects are on the retirement ‘to-do’ lists of three prominent Marketing Department professors.

This year’s three School of Business retirees all hail from the Marketing Department, and include: Continue Reading


Seven Business Faculty Honored

Professor Greg Reilly, teaching an Executive MBA course in Hartford, Conn. (Nathan Oldham/UConn School of Business)
Professor Greg Reilly, teaching an Executive MBA course in Hartford, Conn. (Nathan Oldham/UConn School of Business)

Professor Reilly Recognized for Remarkable Research; Peers Honored for Teaching Strategies

Management Professor Greg Reilly earned the School of Business’ annual award for Research Excellence, an achievement that is based on five years of academic success. Continue Reading


Dean’s Annual Report 2016

UConn School of Business Dean's Annual Report 2016

Transforming Futures

In describing the UConn School of Business at this moment, 76 years into its accomplished history, the word “engaged” captures the essence. Our students, faculty and staff are engaged with each other, with our alumni, with the corporate community and with the University.

The School’s growth has been extraordinary, both in terms of enrollment and creating and maintaining vibrant, effective and relevant academic programs. We are transforming the future—of our students, our state, our industries and our world. There is much to celebrate.

We invite you to read the 2016 Dean’s Annual Report.