Jeffrey Cohen


Professor Cohen Earns Prestigious Appointment at Federal Reserve

Professor Jeffrey Cohen posing at a
Real Estate Banquet, Spring 2022. (Contributed Photo)

Professor Jeffrey Cohen has been named a Research Fellow for the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis, where he will work on issues involving real estate and economic inequality.

Cohen, who is the Kinnard Scholar in Real Estate at UConn, earned the prestigious appointment after serving as a visiting scholar for the Fed for 20 years. The honor is bestowed on only a handful of academics each year.

“I’m very interested in questions of how real estate wealth accumulated differently over time for Black and Latino homeowners and residents, compared with others, and what can be done to try and remedy any potential inequalities that are found,” Cohen said.

His most recent research studied how proximity to highways affects home values in Connecticut, including how the interstate system, built between 1940 and 1960, destroyed some communities and created value for others. Cohen found a direct correlation between the proximity to Interstate 84 and increased home values, which disproportionately benefitted Caucasian families.

Appointment Is a Researcher’s Dream

In his new role, Cohen will serve with the Institute for Economic Equity, a relatively new arm of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis. He will conduct research, give presentations, attend seminars, and contribute to the Fed’s ‘brain trust’ on issues of inequality. Cohen said he is familiar with many of his colleagues at the Institute and is excited to collaborate with them.

“They are extremely bright and well-published individuals who share a vision of enhancing equality for underserved populations,” he said. The connection is a researcher’s dream both in terms of colleagues and access to insightful data, he said.

Cohen, who joined the UConn School of Business in 2014, teaches in both the undergraduate and MBA programs and he will continue with those and all his other responsibilities. He was the principal investigator on Phase One of a State of Connecticut Department of Transportation and U.S. Department of Transportation grant investigating how a new rail commuter line connecting New Haven, Hartford and Springfield, Mass., would impact real estate value near the stations. He was also the principal investigator evaluating the property value impact of the CTfastrak bus-line project on Phases 1 and 2 of these projects. His work with the State of Connecticut on these transit-oriented development projects date back to 2016.

In addition, he is currently the principal investigator on a multi-year, $500,000 project funded by the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation’s Systems for Action, studying how the CTfastrak bus line has impacted the costs and outcomes of treating substance use patients, and how these systems can be aligned.

The St. Louis Fed is one of 12 regional Reserve banks that, along with the Board of Governors in Washington, D.C., comprise the Federal Reserve System. As the nation’s central bank, the Federal Reserve System formulates U.S. monetary policy, regulates state-chartered member banks and bank holding companies, provides payment services to financial institutions and the U.S. government, and promotes financial literacy, economic education, and community development.


The heat is on: 7 things to know about Greater Hartford’s summer home sale market

Hartford Courant (Yahoo News) The Greater Hartford home sale market snagged a top-10 spot in a new national ranking of hottest housing markets in the country in June, adding to a string of similar flattering mentions since the start of the COVID-19 pandemic.

But how hot is hot?


Professor: Surging Demand for Housing Creates Apartment-Construction Boom in Connecticut

UConn Today – Developers are planning to build thousands of new apartments across Connecticut, tapping into an exploding need for more housing options for everyone from millennials to empty nesters.

“There has really been an unprecedented demand for modern rental housing, not only in Connecticut but in many places across the nation,’’ says Jeffrey Cohen, finance professor and the Kinnard Scholar in Real Estate at the School of Business. “We’re seeing some complexes being developed on empty parcels and many other unused properties being converted into apartments.’’


UConn’s Real Estate Program Ranked #3 in the World

Hartford, Connecticut, USA downtown cityscape
(istockphoto.com)

The Center for Real Estate and Urban Economic Studies is ranked among the Top 3 programs worldwide in research excellence, and boasts two of the most productive contributors to prestigious real-estate academic journals.

The Journal of Real Estate Literature ranked real estate programs based on the number of research articles accepted by the top three academic journals in the industry between 2016 and 2020. UConn had previously ranked Number 7.Continue Reading


Professor Cohen: Despite Pandemic, Cumulative ‘Household Financial Distress’ Isn’t Particularly Bad

Asian senior couple stressed and serious counting with calculator and having money problem
(istockphoto.com)

If you watch the evening news, with long lines at food banks and homes destroyed by weather-related disasters, you might think the vast majority of Americans are in a financial spiral.Continue Reading



How Disasters – Manmade or Natural – Affect the Real Estate Market

Boston Globe Real Estate – Realtor Michelle Oates was in her Andover office on Sept. 13, 2018, when she was told to evacuate. As she and her colleagues stood paralyzed in the parking lot, sirens blaring in the distance and helicopters hovering overhead, selling houses was the last thing on her mind.



In Connecticut, We’re on the Cusp of a Transit Renaissance


History can tell us a lot about the future. Think back to the late 1800s, when many U.S. cities began to grow around train stations. Marketplaces developed as locations where merchants could sell their products, and this attracted customers from all around Connecticut to live and work near the marketplaces.Continue Reading


Cohen, Team to Analyze Growth Tied to New Rail Line

Professor Jeff Cohen , pictured above, at Union Station in Hartford, is studying the impact that a new passenger rail line will have on residential and commercial development. The train, which travels from New Haven to Springfield, Mass., with many stops in between, began service in June. (Nathan Oldham/UConn School of Business)
Professor Jeff Cohen , pictured above, at Union Station in Hartford, is studying the impact that a new passenger rail line will have on residential and commercial development. The train, which travels from New Haven to Springfield, Mass., with many stops in between, began service in June. (Nathan Oldham/UConn School of Business)

Urban planners and government leaders from across the country are expected to be paying close attention to the results of a newly-launched study of how convenient commuter train service impacts the economic growth and development of communities.Continue Reading