Management


Are Good Ideas Contagious?

Innovation: A Collaborative Process

Professor Grosser: When It Comes to Nurturing Innovation, Colleagues Play a Huge Role

Companies can nurture more creativity and innovation by identifying and strategically connecting their best innovators with other employees, because their talent and mindset will likely inspire co-workers. Continue Reading


Enhancing Corporate Strategy

UConn Management Professor Timothy B. Folta (Nathan Oldham/UConn School of Business)
UConn Management Professor Timothy B. Folta (Nathan Oldham/UConn School of Business)

International Conference Organized by Professor Folta Yields Strategic Management Book

An international conference about resource redeployment in multi-business or multi-product firms, organized by UConn management professor Timothy B. Folta, has yielded a new book on the subject. Continue Reading


Myopic Views

Research by UConn management professors David Souder, left, and Greg Reilly confirms that businesses focusing on short-term results are 'leaving profits on the table.' (Nathan Oldham/UConn School of Business)
Research by UConn management professors David Souder, left, and Greg Reilly confirms that businesses focusing on short-term results are ‘leaving profits on the table.’ (Nathan Oldham/UConn School of Business)

UConn Professors Find Evidence that Short-Sighted Business Planning Costs Companies Money

When executives are committed to the long-term viability of their corporation, and invest money in future growth and technology that will not pay off right away, does that give the company a strong competitive advantage?

For years conventional wisdom said yes, even as many companies seemed focused on short-term results instead. New research by UConn management professors David Souder and Greg Reilly, and their colleagues, offers evidence that longer payoff horizons are indeed more profitable. Continue Reading



‘Analytically Eloquent’ Dissertation

Alumna Margaret Luciano ’15 Ph.D. Continues to Win Recognition for Research

Margaret Luciano ’15 Ph.D. (management) was recently awarded the J. Richard Hackman Award for her Ph.D. dissertation. The award is given to a recent graduate whose work shows the greatest potential to advance the understanding of groups beyond one discipline.

Margaret Luciano ’15 Ph.D. (UConn School of Business)
Margaret Luciano ’15 Ph.D. (UConn School of Business)

Luciano’s dissertation, “Unpacking the Dynamics of Cross-Unit Coordination: A Multi-Level Quasi-Experimental Investigation,” studied 2,357 hospital-patient transfers between units over a 16-week period and investigated the implications for patient care.

She received the Hackman Award at the 2016 INGRoup conference in Helsinki, Finland in July. Her adviser, UConn Management Professor John Mathieu, was also in attendance.

At the award ceremony, Luciano’s dissertation was described as “theoretically sophisticated and interesting, methodologically rich and analytically eloquent.” Her research improved the work processes and quality of work life for hospital employees, improved patient quality of care and paid dividends to the hospital, the award committee concluded. “She not only advanced our science, but also our practice,” they said.

Luciano is now an assistant professor of management at Arizona State University.


Teaming Up

McEvoy and Jackson Earn Best Presentation Award

At the Academy of Business Research Conference in New Orleans on March 23-25, Nicole Jackson, Assistant Professor of Management, and Kevin McEvoy, Assistant Professor In-Residence of Marketing, earned a Best Session Presentation Award for their work titled, “Mindfulness, Marketing and Management – Is it all that?”Continue Reading


The Real Story: The Baby Boomer Effect

Fox61 – The authors of a new study of Connecticut’s aging population discuss what they call the “Baby Boomer Effect” on the state’s business landscape and economy. Al and Jenns’ guests are Tom Devitto from Blum Shapiro, New England’s largest business advisory group, and Professor David Souder of the UConn School of Business.


Venture Capital Increases a Startup’s Chances of Issuing Stocks or Finding a Buyer

LSE Business Review – An ultimate challenge for technology entrepreneurs is the need for capital to continue to innovate, sustain, and commercialise their innovation. The considerable risks associated with the technological feasibility, business model credibility, and product or service viability severely limits access to capital, yet angel investors and venture capitalists fill this need by investing in startups in exchange for an equity stake in the company. Does private equity, in fact, provide value-added services by influencing startup innovation and commercialisation beyond mere capital infusion?


Correspondence Between Self- and Good- Manager Descriptions

Professor Gary Powell and co-author, mentor and dissertation adviser, D. Anthony Butterfield
UConn Management Professor Gary Powell stands with his co-author, mentor and dissertation adviser, D. Anthony Butterfield, a professor at UMass, following a presentation to the UConn Management Department this fall. (Ethan Freund/UConn School of Business)

UConn Management Professor Gary Powell stands with his co-author, mentor and dissertation adviser, D. Anthony Butterfield, a professor at UMass, following a presentation to the UConn Management Department this fall. Powell and Butterfield presented research, published by the Journal of Management, titled “Correspondence Between Self- and Good-Manager Descriptions: Examining Stability and Change Over Four Decades.” Even today, as women attain college degrees in record numbers and have a larger presence in the workforce, sex-based inequalities create hurdles to leadership roles for women that their male counterparts do not face, they concluded.


As Connecticut Baby Boomers Prepare to Retire in Droves, Who Will Buy Their Prospering Businesses?

Management Professor David Souder
Management Professor David Souder (Nathan Oldham/UConn School of Business)

The UConn School of Business, in conjunction with business-advisory firm BlumShapiro, has released the first installment of a report called, “The Baby Boomer Effect,” which examines the impact an aging generation is having on Connecticut’s business landscape.

The first installment of the report examines the current and future demographics of business ownership in Connecticut, and highlights the dramatic change that Connecticut will experience during the next 10 to 15 years as a large number of business owners reach retirement age.Continue Reading