Namho Kang


Stamford Hedge Fund Pushes City Mall Owner for Change

Connecticut Post – Jon Litt takes an elevator down from his seventh-floor offices at the downtown Landmark Square complex and walks a few steps to visit the city’s shopping mall.

At the Stamford Town Center, the founder and chief investment officer of hedge fund Land and Buildings enjoys visiting establishments such as the Apple store and Saks Fifth Avenue Off 5TH.

But Litt sees much more than a place to go shopping.



Seven Business Faculty Honored

Professor Greg Reilly, teaching an Executive MBA course in Hartford, Conn. (Nathan Oldham/UConn School of Business)
Professor Greg Reilly, teaching an Executive MBA course in Hartford, Conn. (Nathan Oldham/UConn School of Business)

Professor Reilly Recognized for Remarkable Research; Peers Honored for Teaching Strategies

Management Professor Greg Reilly earned the School of Business’ annual award for Research Excellence, an achievement that is based on five years of academic success. Continue Reading


Finance Professors Honored for Research

Jose Martinez, left, and Namho Kang have both been presented with highly prestigious awards. (Nathan Oldham/UConn School of Business)
Jose Martinez, left, and Namho Kang have both been presented with highly prestigious awards. (Nathan Oldham/UConn School of Business)

Martinez, Kang Honored for Outstanding Research on Investment Perceptions, Practices

Finance professors Jose Martinez and Namho Kang have both received prestigious recognitions for their separate research endeavors. Continue Reading


A Little White Lie – or Worse?

Lying?

UConn Researcher Discovers that Retail Execs Downplay, Mislead Outlook in Reports to Stockholders

Many CEOs from major U.S. retailers tend to soften, possibly even distort, their company’s financial standings and offer stakeholders pessimistic predictions about the future, even when their companies are thriving.Continue Reading




New Study Claims Corporate Executives Intentionally Mislead Investors for Personal Gain

Bloomberg – It won’t surprise any market-watcher to learn that in the run-up to earnings season, companies tend to lower the bar for top and bottom line performance, thereby giving themselves better odds of exceeding analysts’ expectations.

However, a new working paper suggests that the sins of omission that occur during the corporate “cheating” season, as it was dubbed by Societe Generale Global Head of Quantitative Strategy Andrew Lapthorne, are far more insidious.