Accelerate UConn




Dyes Detect Disease Through Heartbeat Signals

UConn Today – Vibrant tones of yellow, orange, and red move in waves across the screen. Although the display looks like psychedelic art, it’s actually providing highly technical medical information – the electrical activity of a beating heart stained with voltage-sensitive dyes to test for injury or disease.

These voltage-sensitive dyes were developed and patented by UConn Health researchers, who have now embarked on commercializing their product for industry as well as academic use.


Dyes Detect Disease Through Heartbeat Signals

Health News Digest – Vibrant tones of yellow, orange, and red move in waves across the screen. Although the display looks like psychedelic art, it’s actually providing highly technical medical information – the electrical activity of a beating heart stained with voltage-sensitive dyes to test for injury or disease.


Colleges Boost Entrepreneurship Classes, Seminars

Hartford Business JournalMichelle Cote, managing director of the Connecticut Center for Entrepreneurship and Innovation (CCEI) at the UConn School of Business, said it’s a great time to be an aspiring entrepreneur at UConn and statewide based on the resources available to help them.


New Device Improves Measurement of Water Pollution

UConn Today – UConn researchers have developed a device that makes it easier to measure contaminant levels in water. With help from UConn’s National Science Foundation Innovation Corps program, Accelerate UConn, marine geochemist Penny Vlahos and graduate student Joe Warren are now well on their way to commercializing their technology.



New Product Seeks to Prevent Premature Labor

UConn Today – When Dr. Courtney Townsel sees an expectant mother with a rare, but serious condition called cervical insufficiency, she only has a few treatment options. Despite steady advances in how we treat mothers and their unborn babies during high-risk pregnancies, none of her options are ideal. In fact, the procedure most commonly performed to treat cervical insufficiency has remained largely the same since the 1950s.


Accelerate UConn Advances Promising Technologies

Office of the Vice President for Research -A dozen promising technologies are making progress toward the market thanks to Accelerate UConn (AU), the University of Connecticut’s National Science Foundation (NSF) entrepreneurship program. Several high-potential faculty-student teams recently completed rigorous business training provided through the program, culminating with final presentations before their peers, university administrators, and members of the business community.